The Live and Times of CIA operative Abdul Jandali – Steve Jobs’ father

The mainstream press leaves so many interesting details out of their investigations.

Steve Jobs’  parents and CIA operatives Jandali and Schieble, who divorced in 1962 and never saw each other again.  “They were my sperm and egg bank. That’s not harsh, it’s just the way it was, a sperm bank thing, nothing more.”

1931 – Jandali was born in Homs, Syria to a wealthy landowner. Homs (the “Capital of the Revolution”) and nearby Hama have been epicenters of Muslim Brotherhood anti-government activities, and the consequent massacres of tens of thousands, for decades.

“My father was a self-made millionaire who owned extensive areas of land [in Syria] which included entire villages. He had a strong personality and, in contrast to other parents in our country, my father did not reveal his feelings towards us, but I knew that he loved me because he loved his children” – Jandali

1950 – Two years after the creation of the Zionist entity, eighteen year old Jandali left Syria to study at the American University of Beirut, embracing the terrorist agenda and supporting the jihad. He featured as one of the Arab nationalism activists in Beirut, quickly rose to prominence,  and was appointed as the director of “Al Urwa Al Wuthka” journal (The trustworthy Guide), a journal that embraced the symbols of the Arab nationalist movement like George Habash’s  Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine.

In 1970, Habash masterminded the hijackings of four Western airliners over the United States, Europe, the Far East and the Persian Gulf. The aircraft were blown up, after the passengers and crews were forced to disembark. Habash was also behind the hijacking of an Air France airliner to Entebbe, Uganda and an attack on Israel’s Lod airport in which 27 people were shot to death.[5] Forty-seven people were killed in the bombing of a Swissair jet in 1970.[3]

Coming to America and the CIA

1954 – with appropriate CIA clearance and surveillance,  23 yr old  Jandali moved to the U.S. to continue his work. He lived with one of his relatives, Syrian ambassador to the United Nations, Najm Eddin al-Rifai in New York.

Jandali spent a year studying at Colombia University and then at Wisconsin University where he received a scholarship that enabled him to obtain a master’s and a Ph.D. in Economics and political sciences.

1955 – on February 24 Steve Jobs was born to Jandali and his Catholic girlfriend Joanne Carol Schieble. They were not permitted to keep the boy and arranged for him to be adopted. Both Jandali and Schieble signed away their parental rights to Paul and Clara Jobs.

Was Steve a cloned ‘test-tube’ baby?

Despite Steve’s explicit statement that his conception was not a natural process, people prefer to think Steve is just being melodramatic by referring not only to his father as a sperm-donor but to his birth mother, who he obviously never received love from, as an egg bank donor also.

“They were my sperm and egg bank. That’s not harsh, it’s just the way it was, a sperm bank thing, nothing more.” – Steve Jobs

“I was very much in love with Schieble, but sadly, her father was a tyrant, and forbade her to marry me, as I was from Syria. And so she told me she wanted to give the baby up for adoption.” – Jandali

Fortunately a few months (weeks?)  later Schieble’s tyrant father was dead, and on the day after Christmas the young lovers were able to get married in a non-denominational ceremony. They hoped to conceive another child together to replace the one they had given away the year before.

1957 – June 14th – Allah blesses the Jandalis with another child, Mona, whom they decide to keep. Soon international business takes the family to Syria for 4 years, where Abdul directs an oil refinery in Homs, helping to supply the armies of the United Arab Republic fighting Israel during the Suez crisis.

1958-1961 – United Arab Republic – Syria joined with Egypt under President Nassar to unite in their struggle to eliminate the Zionist entity.

“I had two choices. Either go back to my home country and work with the Syrian government, or stay in the United States and in university education, and that is what I did for a while. I went back to Syria … I worked as a manager at a refinery plant in my hometown of Homs for a year, during which Syria was part of the United Arab Republic and run by the Egyptians. Egyptian engineers, for example, ran the Ministry of Energy in Syria. When we lost the war, I went back to the United States to rejoin education there.”

1962 – After the UAR was defeated and Syria succeeded, Jandali’s non-Muslim wife was unhappy there and left with Mona, who was 4 at the time, to return to the States – soon afterwards Jandali also returned to the US and they were divorced – NY Post

According to Mona, Jandali  “changed his number and left no forwarding address” when he left his wife and child.  Fortunately he did not go into hiding or change his name,  was still listed in phone books and business directories, fulfilled the terms of the divorce, and could be contacted at any time.

“If we had just held off for a few months, then we would have been able to raise Steve as our own, but sadly, that was not the case,” Jandali said. “We often spoke of our son and how we both wished he was with us, especially when Joanne gave birth to Steve’s sister, Mona. But nothing to do with Joanne and I was ever meant to be.” – Jandali

1982 – Steve Jobs is 27 when he meet his younger sister, Mona, and his biological mother, Schieble, and they spoke freely at at length about their relationship and his father, Jandali.

1982 – Steve met his sister, Mona, and his “egg bank” donor mom, Schieble, and learned everything there was to know about his father and the circumstances of his birth and adoption. “And I didn’t like what I learned”

“I didn’t like what I learned”

Once Steve discovered the identity of his father, he was curious and decided to visit the restaurant that he operated.

“When I was looking for my biological mother, obviously I was looking for my biological father at the same time. I learned a little bit about him, and I didn’t like what I learned.

It turns out he managed or owned a restaurant, and I was in the restaurant once or twice, and I remember meeting the owner who was from Syria, and it was most certainly him, and I shook his hand and he shook my hand and that’s all.

… and many, many years later, I finally realized that the Syrian gu that looked like me that  I had met in the falafal restaurant named Jandali was the SAME Janduli my sister and mom had told me about in 1982.

An American Tragedy

Unfortunately Jandali’s Islamic pride required him to NOT acknowledge the relationship, although he knew that it was his son, Steve Jobs, who was looking him in the eye, shaking his hand, and hoping for some sort of acknowledgment from his biological father.

This might sound strange

“This might sound strange, though, but I am not prepared, even if either of us was on our deathbeds, to pick up the phone to call him. Steve will have to do that, as the Syrian pride in me does not want him ever to think I am after his fortune … but he was a great tipper”

Jandali describes one of the highlights of his life – meeting his son Steve Jobs.

“He was a great tipper”

In an interview for CBS’s 60 Minutes, Mr Isaacson said: “Mona goes to the coffee shop, meets this guy Mr Jandali who’s running it, who says among other things when she asks, how sorry he is.

“Then he said that he had had another child. Mona said: ‘What happened to him?’ and he said: ‘Oh, I don’t know, we’ll never hear from him again’.”

Mr Jandali then said that he wished Miss Simpson could have seen him running his old Mediterranean restaurant, which he said was “one of the best in Silicon Valley”.

“Everyone used to eat there,” he said. “Even Steve Jobs.”

As Miss Simpson stayed silent but “looked shocked”, Mr Jandali added: “Yeah, he was a great tipper!”, according to Mr Isaacson.

While lamenting that he’ll never hear from his son Steve Jobs again (?),  and bragging to daughter Mona, proud Muslim father Jandali is inspired to relate, among all the famous people he’s served, that he’d already met Steve Jobs, although he apparently had forgotten that a couple named Jobs had adopted his son.

Nice to have never met you

Steve had already twice visited the restaurant, reached out his hand, looked his father in the eye, and hoped for some sort of acknowledgement.

“This might sound strange, though, but I am not prepared, even if either of us was on our deathbeds, to pick up the phone to call him. Steve will have to do that, as the Muslim pride in me does not want him ever to think I am after his fortune” – sperm-donor Jandali

Now I just live in hope that he will reach out to me

“Now I just live in hope that, before it is too late, he will reach out to me, because even to have just one coffee with him just once would make me a very happy man” – Proud Muslim “sperm donor” Jandali

An American Dream – Abdul Jandali – from falafal chef to millionaire vice-chairman of a Reno casino.

“I believe in Islam as a doctrine and culture.”

After returning from Syria Jandali devoted himself to realizing the American Dream by opening a number of successful Middle Eastern falafal restaurants and coffee houses.

Soon he was asked to join the Boomtown Casino and Hotel in Reno, and in no time at all was promoted to vice chairman of the company, which employs over 450 people and ensures that billions of US dollars are being funneled to the proper authorities.

from ” The life and Times of  Abdul Jandali”

There’s a popular saying about three apples that have changed the world: Adam’s apple, Isaac Newton’s apple and Steve Jobs “Apple”. As successful as the founder of Apple was, Jobs passed away Thursday without ever having met his real father, despite their living in the same country.

After Jobs passed away, Al-Arabiya.net tried to contact his biological father, Abdul Fattah Jandali. The 80-year-old Syrian immigrant has been living in the United States for a long time now and is the Vice Chairman of the Boomtown Casino and Hotel in Reno, Nevada.

Although we called the hotel in the evening when casinos are at their busiest, the operator repeated the same answer over and over again: “Mr. Jandali only works in the morning, he rarely comes at night.”

There’s little about Jandali in the American press because he rarely spoke about being Jobs’ biological father.

Jobs too appeared keen to keep the identities of his father and sister Mona secret.

Mona Simpson is a successful American novelist who only met Jobs when he was 27 year old. They did, however, keep in touch.

From Beirut to America

In an interview with Fortune magazine, Jandali shared his family’s story. He was born in 1931 in Homs, Syria to a wealthy landowner. At 18, Jandali left Syria to Beirut to continue his studies at the American University of Beirut. Jandali described Beirut as the city “where I spent the best days of my life”.

In the 2007 issue of “Campus gate”, a magazine published by the American University of Beirut, Jandali featured as one of the Arab nationalism activists in Beirut who quickly rose to prominence and was appointed as the director of “Al Urwa Al Wuthka” journal (The trustworthy Guide), a journal that embraced the symbols of the Arab nationalist movement like George Habash, Constantin Zureiq, Shafik al-Hout and many others.

In the same issue, Dr.Yussef Chebel wrote a story on the “Urwa Al Wuthka Association”; it was founded in 1918 and presided over by Jandali once but dissolved in 1954 when Beirut was teeming with protests demanding the resignation of then Lebanese president Bechara El Khoury. Khoury was uncompromising on renewing his mandate against the dispositions of the Lebanese constitution but he finally resigned and became the first Arab president to step down under the pressure of demonstrations and protests in the streets and squares.

If it wasn’t for those protests in Beirut, Jandali would have probably stayed in Lebanon, married and had children there.

However, the political situation in Beirut pushed Jandali to travel to the U.S. in 1954, where he lived with one of his relatives, the Syrian ambassador to the United Nations, Najm Eddin al-Rifai in New York. Jandali spent a year studying at Colombia University and then at Wisconsin University where he received a scholarship that enabled him to obtain a master’s and a Ph.D. in Economics and political sciences.

Baby blues

When he was studying in Wisconsin, Jandali dated a German-Swiss woman, Joanne Carol Schieble. Joanne got pregnant but her conservative father refused to allow her to marry Jandali, who left Joanne a few days before the baby boy’s arrival in 1956. He would never see his son.

Joanne placed her newborn child for adoption in San Francisco and soon enough, a couple, Paul and Clara Jobs, adopted the boy. The baby too disappeared for good and his biological mother lost track of him after he and his family moved many times.

A few months after the adoption, Jandali reappeared in Joanne’s life and they married; a year later they had a girl they named Mona. Soon thereafter, he began to face financial problems and was pushed to travel to Syria in the hope that he could get a job in the diplomatic corps, having been influenced by his ambassadorial relative.

The university professor becomes a restaurant owner

Jandali was unable to fulfill his diplomatic dream so he worked as a director in an oil refinery in Homs for a year. During this time, he separated from his wife and then they divorced.

In 1962, Jandali returned to the U.S. but did not contact Joanne, who had remarried an American. He would learn of this a few years later when he reconnected with her.
Jandalai began working as an assistant professor at Michigan University and later Nevada University.

Time passed and Jandali was moving from one job to another: he bought a restaurant and then worked as a director in prominent companies and institutions in Las Vegas before returning to the restaurant industry where he opened two restaurants in Reno before joining Boomtown Casino and Hotel. He got promoted over the years and was made vice chairman of the company at the age of 80, although he looks 10 years younger in photos.

In an interview with the British Observer earlier this year, Jandali said he had not visited Syria and Lebanon in the past 35 years. He said he was a non-practicing Muslim who did not perform the pilgrimage to Mecca, “but I believe in Islam as a doctrine and culture. I also believe in family and advise Arab youth who come to the States to study, not to stay long because the Arab world is full of opportunities, especially Gulf countries.”

Father and son

Jandali once mentioned his son Jobs in an interview to “The Las Vegas Sun” in March 2010. He said that he had left his daughter when she was five “because her mother divorced me when I moved to Syria. I tried to reach her 10 years later, but [it was] in vain. She changed her home address and 10 years ago I managed to contact her and now we meet three times every year.”

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